Understanding Apraxia and Dyspraxia

Have you ever been in a situation where everything within you desired to do something but you just couldn’t? Where your mind and heart were set on accomplishing a goal or a task but your body just literally said, “Stop. Incorrect input. Cannot proceed.” Children with Apraxia and Dyspraxia experience this every single day in one way or another. Their minds want to achieve things, their body wants to move and function the way they are being prompted—but their brain says, “Stop. Invalid information. Unable to process your request.”

 

When we are looking at kids suffering from Apraxia or Dyspraxia (a mild form of Apraxia) we need to understand what is at the heart of the disorder so that we might be able to address the underlying causes. For patients experiencing symptoms of apraxia or dyspraxia, we might see several things that would alert us to the challenges they are facing. Some include the inability to perform facial movements on command, the inability to make fine, precise movements with an arm or leg, the inability to make the proper movement in response to a verbal command, the inability to coordinate actives with multiple, sequential movements, such as dressing, eating and bathing, difficulty coordinating mouth and speech movements, or the inability to copy, draw, or construct simple figures.

 

In basic definition, Apraxia results from a dysfunction of the cerebral hemispheres of the brain, especially the parietal lobe, and can arise from many diseases or damage to the brain. This means that we have to find a way to support and intentionally engage the cerebral hemispheres where there may be defects from underlying medical challenges. If we want to see our children experiencing improved motor function in the areas we have to look deeper.

 

When a child is facing these types of challenges it can lead to extreme frustration, confusion, and ultimately apathy. In anything, we do as parents, educators, therapists, or practitioners, our goal should always be to support the whole body and lead towards growth and increased function. Looking specifically at the breakdown going on in the brain with Apraxia, we see from the research that supporting the brain with specific vitamins can have a dramatic effect on the brain as it attempts to execute the functions of everyday life.

 

The following are some of the most valuable components that we want to introduce to patients:

 

Biotin: high concentrations found in the cerebellum of the brain, the cerebellum is important for coordination and motor planning. Biotin is co-localized with Molybdenum and Vitamin B1 (thiamine) in pathways involved in the process of sulfation. Sulfation helps cells stick together, in other words, it helps cell membrane integrity and prevents leakiness. Sulfation is also a key factor in the detoxification of phenols, salicylates, chemicals, and hormones.

 

Benfotiamine: a fat-soluble form of thiamine (Vitamin B1) that crosses the blood-brain barrier. It is highly concentrated in parts of the brain which are important for language, mood, and cognition.  Also important for balancing the autonomic nervous system.

 

Pantothenic Acid: is a vitamin essential for production and metabolism of protein, carbohydrate, and fat. Fatty acid synthesis is especially important for neuronal cell health.

 

Molybdenum: a mineral cofactor involved in sulfation as well as clearing uric acid and excess copper from the body.
The combination of Biotin, Molybdenum and Vitamin B1 help cell membranes to stay healthy and connected. 

 

Something we want to be aware of as we are supporting anyone in the area of cerebral function, nervous system, or motor function is this: our goal is always to support the body to the point that it will then begin to take over and produce naturally what is needed. So with any support, we introduce into the body, we do so with the ultimate hope of reducing the supplementation and having the body take over natural and normal production for correct motor function and planning. 

 

How can we be intentional?

 

Find a safe, high-quality product that is going to support the brain and kick start the body in the area of motor function.
You want to look for a few key things in a product:

 

1. Safe dosing of ingredients so as to slowly introduce these agents and then build up as the body responds.

 

2. A product with ingredients that can be built upon and added to as you learn to support the overall health of the body and see positive responses.

 

3. A product free of unnecessary additives such as artificial colors, artificial flavors, milk or milk derivatives or sodium.

 

Our Solution:

 

Motor Connect

 

 

The four nutrients in this formula work together to help with connectivity, energy production, cell membrane integrity, and overall neuronal health.

 

In addition to the nutrients in Motor Connect, healthy fats, phospholipids and fat-soluble antioxidants are an integral part of any protocol to improve neuronal connectivity.

 

Stop supplements containing biotin prior to blood testing for thyroid conditions as it may artificially interfere with the results.

 

Contains no artificial colors, flavors, milk or milk derivatives or sodium added.

 

**These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These products are not meant to diagnose‚ treat or cure any disease or medical condition. Please consult your doctor before starting any exercise or nutritional supplement program or before using these or any product during pregnancy or if you have a serious medical condition.

 

References:
1-Syndrome of allergy, apraxia, and malabsorption: characterization of a neurodevelopmental phenotype that responds to omega 3 and vitamin E supplementation. Claudia R. Morris, Marilyn C. Agin Altern Ther Health Med. 2009 Jul–Aug; 15(4): 34–43.
2- Epigenetic synergies between biotin and folate in the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and repeats. Jing Xue and Janos Zempleni Scand J Immunol. 2013 Nov; 78(5): 10.1111/sji.12108.
3- Biotin and pantothenic acid oversupplementation to conditional SLC5A6 KO mice prevents the development of intestinal mucosal abnormalities and growth defects. Sabui S, Kapadia R, Ghosal A, Schneider M, Lambrecht NWG, Said HM. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2018 Jul 1;315(1):C73-C79
4. Neuroprotective potential of high-dose biotin. McCarty MF, DiNicolantonio JJ. Med Hypotheses. 2017 Nov;109:145-149
5. Dysautonomia in autism spectrum disorder: case reports of a family with review of the literature. Lonsdale D, Shamberger RJ, Obrenovich ME. Autism Res Treat. 2011;2011:129795.
6. Thiamin. Lonsdale D. Adv Food Nutr Res. 2018;83:1-56
7. Benfotiamine attenuates inflammatory response in LPS stimulated BV-2 microglia. Bozic I, Savic D, Laketa D, Bjelobaba I, Milenkovic I, Pekovic S, Nedeljkovic N, Lavrnja I. PLoS One. 2015 Feb 19;10(2):e0118372.
8. Thiamine deficiency contributes to synapse and neural circuit defects. Yu Q, Liu H, Sang S, Chen L, Zhao Y, Wang Y, Zhong C. Biol Res. 2018 Sep 19;51(1):35.

6 Comments

  1. Alessandra Trosclair

    Can this be taken with other supplements? If taken with other supplements that contain similar ingredients, is there a limit on how much one should consume?

    Reply

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